How to Safely Make Lifestyle Changes With Type 2 Diabetes

Gain control of your disease while still protecting your heart

How to Safely Make Lifestyle Changes With Type 2 Diabetes

If you're overweight or obese and have type 2 diabetes, a new study reveals how to make lifestyle changes that will help you safely gain control of your disease and still protect your heart.

Researchers published a study in Diabetes Care that took a second — and more in-depth — look at data from the NIH's Look AHEAD study. They found that for 85% of people in that study, lifestyle interventions that triggered weight loss and increased physical activity reduced potential cardiovascular problems. Such lifestyle interventions also help reduce the risks for diabetes, dementia and some cancers and strengthen the immune system.


But... and there's always a but… for folks in that study who had poor blood sugar control, the lifestyle interventions were actually risky! It turns out that upgrading your lifestyle without first gaining control of blood sugar levels makes it 85% more likely you'll have a cardiac event.

So if you're ready to conquer your type 2 diabetes, talk to your doctor about first making sure your blood sugar is well controlled through medication and diet. Once that is established, then you're ready to start a weight-loss and exercise program that will help you make a dramatic shift in your life trajectory.

Here's Dr. Oz's Mom's Regimen for Fighting Her Alzheimer's

Here are the tools she uses to help manage the progression of the disease.

Personal photos courtesy of Dr.Oz

When Dr. Oz found out in September 2019 that his mom, Suna, then 81, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, he was gutted. He wondered how he missed the signs and what he could do next. Like so many caregivers, he had to recognize that his mom was not going to get better. But he also knew that he wasn't alone: There is an Alzheimer's diagnosis every 65 seconds.

Dr. Oz immediately contacted his friends and colleagues and crafted a treatment plan with two of the country's top experts in the field: Richard S. Isaacson, MD, a neurologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the founder of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic, and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard and the founder of the "Alzheimer's Genome Project," who co-discovered the first Alzheimer's gene.

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