Beat the Burn

Most people experience it at one time or another – an uncomfortable warm, burning sensation in the chest known as heartburn or acid indigestion. Heartburn has nothing to do with the heart but is caused by stomach acid. It occurs when gastric acids back up into the lower esophagus. Common symptoms include burning in the chest area (usually below or behind the sternum), pain that intensifies when lying down, and sometimes coughing or wheezing.

Over 50 million Americans suffer from frequent heartburn (occurring 2 to 3 times a week). Heartburn can strike at any time and can interfere with sleep, daily activities such as work and exercise, and decrease your overall quality of life. It’s up to you to make these simple changes and say goodbye to heartburn. Learn how to beat the burn with these steps.


Exercise = Less Burn

You’ve heard that regular exercise is one of the best things you can do to increase overall health and longevity. Now you can add another reason to get your body moving. Physical activity helps keep your digestive tract running smoothly and also relieves stress, a major cause of heartburn. \r\n

\r\nTo help ease heartburn, fit some movement into your day, every day, whether that means hitting the gym, taking a 20-minute bike ride or simply strolling around the block. It’s a good idea to wait at least 30 minutes after eating before exercising. Some exercises such as crunches or a core workout on a full stomach can lead to heartburn. Also, avoid engaging in activities that require a lot of bending (such as gardening) directly after eating.

Is Your Stomach Cramp Actually Diverticulitis?

It may not just be indigestion.

We've all been there — we get a cramp in our stomach, maybe with some nausea or constipation. It's easy to think it may just be indigestion. But what if it's something more serious like diverticulitis? That's a condition of inflammation or infection in one or more small pouches that can form in your digestive tract. Here's how to tell the difference between the pain and how to know when you should see a doctor.