Noses and Ears Continue to Grow as We Age

Do you think you stopped growing at age 18? If that’s true, how come the older you get, the bigger your nose and ears seem to be? Ok, you might find some teenagers with large noses, but big ears are just not found on young people. Well, here’s the news flash: it turns out that scientists in Italy have confirmed - ears actually do grow as we age.

A woman tucks her hair behind her ear.
Should I Pop It?
Should I Pop It?

Do you think you stopped growing at age 18? If that’s true, how come the older you get, the bigger your nose and ears seem to be? Ok, you might find some teenagers with large noses, but big ears are just not found on young people. Well, here’s the news flash: it turns out that scientists in Italy have confirmed - ears actually do grow as we age.

That’s right. Bones, stop growing after puberty and muscle and fat cells also stop dividing. But cartilage - that’s the plastic-like stuff in ears and noses - cartilage continues to grow until the day you die. Not only does cartilage grow, but the earlobes elongate from gravity. And that makes ears look even larger.


So it’s really true. Older people do have larger noses and ears. What to do? Rhinoplasties can pare down that extra cartilage that gives you that bulbous nose. And your plastic surgeon can get creative and whittle down your earlobes so they fit nicely inside your earphones.

Here's Dr. Oz's Mom's Regimen for Fighting Her Alzheimer's

Here are the tools she uses to help manage the progression of the disease.

Personal photos courtesy of Dr.Oz

When Dr. Oz found out in September 2019 that his mom, Suna, then 81, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, he was gutted. He wondered how he missed the signs and what he could do next. Like so many caregivers, he had to recognize that his mom was not going to get better. But he also knew that he wasn't alone: There is an Alzheimer's diagnosis every 65 seconds.

Dr. Oz immediately contacted his friends and colleagues and crafted a treatment plan with two of the country's top experts in the field: Richard S. Isaacson, MD, a neurologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the founder of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic, and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard and the founder of the "Alzheimer's Genome Project," who co-discovered the first Alzheimer's gene.

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