10 Natural Ways to Relieve Your Worst Menopause Symptoms

Try these natural solutions to cope with menopause.

10 Natural Ways to Relieve Your Worst Menopause Symptoms

Menopause is a natural process in a woman's life. But for some women, the symptoms can be unbearable. If you experience hot flashes, night sweats, or vaginal dryness, give some of these remedies a shot. Curated by women's health experts, these tips may help relieve your worst menopausal symptoms so you can live a happier life.


Remember to Stay Hydrated

Remember to Stay Hydrated

Hot flashes and night sweats are the most common symptoms of menopause. As the name suggests, they elevate your internal temperature an uncomfortable amount. To combat them it's important to keep your body at a stable and relaxed temperature. Dr. Leah Millheiser OB/GYN and Director of Female Sexual Medicine Program at Stanford University suggests making sure you stay hydrated to regulate your system's temperature in a healthy way. Drink at least eight glasses of water a day to naturally combat menopause and keep your body healthy too.

More: 9 Creative Ways to Drink More Water

Here's Dr. Oz's Mom's Regimen for Fighting Her Alzheimer's

Here are the tools she uses to help manage the progression of the disease.

Personal photos courtesy of Dr.Oz

When Dr. Oz found out in September 2019 that his mom, Suna, then 81, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, he was gutted. He wondered how he missed the signs and what he could do next. Like so many caregivers, he had to recognize that his mom was not going to get better. But he also knew that he wasn't alone: There is an Alzheimer's diagnosis every 65 seconds.

Dr. Oz immediately contacted his friends and colleagues and crafted a treatment plan with two of the country's top experts in the field: Richard S. Isaacson, MD, a neurologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the founder of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic, and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard and the founder of the "Alzheimer's Genome Project," who co-discovered the first Alzheimer's gene.

Keep ReadingShow less