Ensuring the safety of our products – and maintaining the confidence of consumers – is the single most important goal of our industry.  Product safety is the foundation of consumer trust, and our industry devotes enormous resources to ensure that our products are safe. 

Diacetyl has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) for the use in food products since 1983.  It is most widely known for its use as a butter flavoring in microwave popcorn.  The FDA, the Center for Disease Control and the American Lung Association have all concluded that butter flavoring from microwave popcorn does not pose a risk to the consumer.  However, to address consumer preferences the majority of food companies have reformulated their microwave popcorn products to reduce or eliminate the use of diacetyl in butter flavoring used in those products. 


Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) can be found in trace amounts in liners of microwavable popcorn bags.  In a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) study, microwave popcorn bags contained 6–290 parts per billion PFOA, a trace amount that is determined to be safe by FDA.  Similar coatings are also used in fast food wrappers, candy wrappers, and pizza box liners.

3 Dos & Don'ts for Microwaving Popcorn

Microwave guru chef Matt Abdoo has his three tips for making the best, fluffiest and perfectly cooked popcorn.

Microwave popcorn is one of the best snacks! But sometimes it's difficult to get that perfect bowl. So microwave guru chef Matt Abdoo has his three tips for making the best, fluffiest and perfectly cooked popcorn.

DON'T USE THE POPCORN BUTTON

As tempting and easy as it may be, don't fall for the "Popcorn" button on your microwave. Not all microwaves are made the same, so they won't cook your bag the same way either. And there's no sensor to determine when the bag is ready, so it'll just keep cooking your popcorn until the set amount of time finishes.

Keep ReadingShow less