Type 2 Diabetes Can Greatly Increase Your Risk of Dementia — What to Do About It

A new study says having type 2 diabetes for more than a decade by the time you're 70 doubles your risk of the disease.

A couple cooks a healthy dinner, something that can aid in managing diabetes and, therefore, warding off dementia.

A new study published in JAMA has found dementia is a major complication of diabetes. In fact, if you turn 70 and have had type 2 diabetes for more than a decade, you've doubled your risk for dementia compared to folks who are diabetes-free at 70. And, say the researchers, for every additional five years earlier that you were diagnosed with diabetes, (say at 55 instead of 60), there's a 24% increased risk of developing dementia.

Now, we know that controlling — even banishing — diabetes can seem daunting. There are plenty of ways and opportunities for us to remain sedentary, eat sugary, fatty snacks, increase metabolism-damaging inflammation and darken your future. But there is a way to make sure your inner light doesn't fade.


If you have diabetes, it's time to start fighting the onset of dementia. Adopting a plant-based diet; ditching red and processed meats, ultra-processed foods, and added sugars; and getting 300 minutes a week of aerobic exercise and strength-building twice a week can protect your brain, as well as every other organ in your body.

So, talk to your doctor about nutritional counseling, exercise, and cognitive behavioral therapy to help you decrease your risk of developing dementia.



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When Dr. Oz found out in September 2019 that his mom, Suna, then 81, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, he was gutted. He wondered how he missed the signs and what he could do next. Like so many caregivers, he had to recognize that his mom was not going to get better. But he also knew that he wasn't alone: There is an Alzheimer's diagnosis every 65 seconds.

Dr. Oz immediately contacted his friends and colleagues and crafted a treatment plan with two of the country's top experts in the field: Richard S. Isaacson, MD, a neurologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the founder of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic, and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard and the founder of the "Alzheimer's Genome Project," who co-discovered the first Alzheimer's gene.

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