Food-Poisoning Checklist

Use this guide to common carriers of food poisoning to find out what might be causing your tummy troubles.

Food-Poisoning Checklist

Dinner's over and you're experiencing major gastric distress. What's the cause? Use this guide to common carriers of food poisoning to find out what might be causing your tummy troubles.

Leftover Rice
Surprising as it may seem, rice can be tainted with heat-resistant bacteria that can survive cooking. When you leave rice out at room temperature, that bacteria can multiply quickly and make you sick – but only if you're not careful. Play it safe and put leftover rice in the fridge within two hours of cooking and dispose of any uneaten rice after three days.


Ice Cream
Thawing ice cream allows bacteria to grow, and the biggest mistake you can make with ice cream is putting it back in the freezer after letting it unfreeze. Don't leave the container out on the counter during dessert. Instead, scoop what you need and put the container back in the freezer.

At the store, pay close attention what your pint looks like. If it's frosted with ice, that's a sign that it may have been partially thawed and you need to pick a different carton.

Leafy Greens
Leafy green vegetables like spinach, lettuce and kale are common carriers of food-borne illness. They can be contaminated at any point between harvest and your dinner. Minimize your risk of exposure by following this guide to proper washing and handling.

Turkey
Every year almost 400,000 Americans come down with food poisoning around Thanksgiving. Whether it's the holidays or a healthy weeknight meal, the secret to storing leftover turkey is the two-hours//two-inches rule. Make sure your turkey leftovers are in the fridge within two hours.

Tomatoes
Like salad greens, tomatoes are a risky food because they're regularly consumed raw instead of being cooked to kill bacteria. Minimize your risk of exposure by following this guide to proper washing and handling.

Could you imagine making 4.6 billion calls in a month?

That's how many robocalls Americans received in February this year. And when your phone is ringing endlessly with scammers asking about your car's warranty, a free cruise, or even a scary warning about your insurance coverage, it can definitely seem like all the calls are going to you. So what do you do when you get one of these fake calls and how do you protect your personal information and money from cons? Here are the important steps to take.

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